Untitled

Apr 07

sfmoma:


Fuller’s eccentric views were informed by speculating on future technologies, not past history,” says SFMOMA Acting Department Head/Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher… “Since he worked outside of business, academic, and scientific norms, he never quite fit in. Perhaps it was frustrating for him or maybe it was a calculated elusiveness. Either way, the view of Fuller as an outsider has emerged as an emblem for ‘thinking differently,’ which is a starting point for many Bay Area initiatives.

(via SFMoMA Exhibit: “The Utopian Impulse: Buckminster Fuller and the Bay Area” | ArchDaily)

sfmoma:

Fuller’s eccentric views were informed by speculating on future technologies, not past history,” says SFMOMA Acting Department Head/Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher… “Since he worked outside of business, academic, and scientific norms, he never quite fit in. Perhaps it was frustrating for him or maybe it was a calculated elusiveness. Either way, the view of Fuller as an outsider has emerged as an emblem for ‘thinking differently,’ which is a starting point for many Bay Area initiatives.

(via SFMoMA Exhibit: “The Utopian Impulse: Buckminster Fuller and the Bay Area” | ArchDaily)

Mar 30

cavetocanvas:

Walker Evans, Untitled (Architectural Study, New York), c. 1929
From the Metropolitan Museum:

In his first years as a photographer, when Evans tried out many techniques characteristic of the new vision, he hung an enlargement of this stark image on the wall of his spare New York apartment. Perhaps the photograph was a personal benchmark: it proved that the photographer had learned how to put together a picture, and how to do so with the most common, least picturesque aspects of the contemporary world.

cavetocanvas:

Walker Evans, Untitled (Architectural Study, New York), c. 1929

From the Metropolitan Museum:

In his first years as a photographer, when Evans tried out many techniques characteristic of the new vision, he hung an enlargement of this stark image on the wall of his spare New York apartment. Perhaps the photograph was a personal benchmark: it proved that the photographer had learned how to put together a picture, and how to do so with the most common, least picturesque aspects of the contemporary world.

(via sfmoma)

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
This is from my series Brother and Sister.

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

This is from my series Brother and Sister.

sfmoma:

artistandstudio:

journalofanobody:

the-night-picture-collector:

anneyhall:

Marcel Duchamp, New York, 1948.
Photo by Irving Penn

sfmoma:

artistandstudio:

journalofanobody:

the-night-picture-collector:

anneyhall:

Marcel Duchamp, New York, 1948.

Photo by Irving Penn

sfmoma:

Love this visitor photo in front of Barnett Newman’s Zim Zum I
(by The Brett Walker)

sfmoma:

Love this visitor photo in front of Barnett Newman’s Zim Zum I

(by The Brett Walker)

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
polaroidsf:

Stoned at Fort Funston.

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

polaroidsf:

Stoned at Fort Funston.

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
Storm Waves

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

Storm Waves

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:
‘deux’ by cardboardcities

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

‘deux’ by cardboardcities

fyeahwomenartists:

Julie MehretuRefuge, 2007Etching and aquatint 
(via MoMA | The Collection | Julie Mehretu. Refuge. 2007)

fyeahwomenartists:

Julie Mehretu
Refuge, 2007
Etching and aquatint 

(via MoMA | The Collection | Julie Mehretu. Refuge. 2007)

(via sfmoma)